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Count for all projects in 2009

Impact and Adaptation Studies 160
Regional Climate Analysis and Modeling 88
GHG Emissions Reduction 83
GHG Inventory Methods 61
others 89
481

This site represents only a subset of projects. Please see agency publications for official budget figures.

The State of California has been supporting regional climate change research for more than a decade. These studies have complemented research at the national level and have been designed to inform climate policy deliberations and actions in California. This Research Catalog provides basic information about past and ongoing climate change related studies that state agencies have conducted or commissioned since the early 2000s. The purpose of this catalog is to document California’s research efforts and to facilitate the exchange of information.

To find out more about these projects, please click here to obtain contact information for representatives from different state agencies.

Search results for 2009 Research Projects


  1. Economic Analyses of Sectoral Impacts of Climate Change
    Lead Agency: CEC
    Principal Investigator(s): Mathis, Pam (ICF Resources, LLC)
    Year finished: 2009, Budget: $78,438
    Notes
    Overview of California’s Key Economic Sectors Vulnerable to Climate Change Estimating the Costs of Climate Change Impacts on California’s Transportation System Estimating the Damages from Inland Floods in California Catastrophic Levee Failure: Economic Costs of Climate Change


  2. Economic Impacts of Climate Change on California Agriculture
    Lead Agency: CEC in collaboration with CAT, CDFA
    Principal Investigator(s): Christopher J. Costello, Olivier Deschenes, Charles D. Kolstad Year finished: 2009, Budget: $145,455
    Published/Product: http://energy.ca.gov/publications/displayOneReport.php?pubNum=CEC-500-2009-043-F
    Notes
    Using county-level data from the United States Department of Agriculture's Census of Agriculture, this study evaluates the effect of weather and climate on agricultural profits in the State of California.


  3. Ecosystem Feedbacks to Climate Change in California: Integrated Climate Forcing From Vegetation
    Lead Agency: CEC
    Principal Investigator(s): Lara Kueppers (UC Merced)
    Year finished: 2009, Budget: $75,000
    Published/Product: http://energy.ca.gov/publications/displayOneReport.php?pubNum=CEC-500-2009-075
    Notes
    This study uses a set of regional climate model simulations to measure the climate effects of changes in ecosystem distribution under historical and future climate.


  4. Effect of Climate Change Impacts on Future Renewable Energy Generation (Wind, Solar, Hydro)
    Lead Agency: CEC
    Principal Investigator(s): Duffy, Phillip (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)
    Year finished: 2009, Budget: $450,000
    Published/Product: http://energy.ca.gov/publications/displayOneReport.php?pubNum=CEC-500-2014-111
    Notes
    This study assessed the potential impacts of global climate change on the ability to generate electricity in California from weather‐dependent renewable resources such as wind, solar, and hydropower. Researchers used a sequence of numerical models that simulated climate, surface hydrology, wind power generation, and high‐elevation hydropower generation. The models predicted small to modest decreases in potential electricity generation from each of these resources. Hydropower showed the greatest decrease of the three. These results, however, were highly dependent on the choice of climate models and based on a decrease in annual precipitation in the study region projected by the climate models researchers used. These models were not unique in this regard, but other models projected increases in precipitation and would give more optimistic results for hydropower generation. The projected decrease in wind power may also be specific to the models researchers used but was quite modest. The projected decrease in available sunlight for solar power generation was statistically significant and robust across models, but was also very small. Researchers recommended additional assessments using other models, particularly for wind and hydropower. Study findings will benefit California ratepayers by enabling upfront consideration of future effects of climate change on renewable resource potential. 500-06-044


  5. Effect of Climate Change on Field Crop Production in the Central Valley of California
    Lead Agency: CEC in collaboration with CAT, CDFA
    Principal Investigator(s): Juhwan Lee, Stephen Degryze, Johan Six Year finished: 2009, Budget: $145,455
    Published/Product: http://energy.ca.gov/publications/displayOneReport.php?pubNum=CEC-500-2009-041-F
    Notes
    This study predicts yields for a number of different crops under the A2 (medium-high) and B1 (low) emission scenarios using complex ecosystem modeling that integrates crop growth, nutrient dynamics, hydrology, management and climate.


  6. Effects of Global Climate Change on Building Energy Consumption and its Implications on Building Energy Codes and Policy in California
    Lead Agency: CEC
    Principal Investigator(s): Peng Xu, Yu Joe Huang, Norman Miller, Nicole Schlegel (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)
    Year finished: 2009, Budget: $75,000
    Published/Product: http://energy.ca.gov/publications/displayOneReport.php?pubNum=CEC-500-2009-006
    Notes
    This study used archived General Circulation Model (GCM) projections and statistically downscaled these data to the site scale for input to building cooling and heating simulations. Building energy usage was projected to 2040, 2070, and 2010. This study found that electricity use for cooling will increase by 50 percent over the next 100 years in certain areas of California under the IPCC’s worst‐case carbon emission scenario, A1F1. Under the IPCC’s most likely carbon scenario (A2), the cooling electricity use will increase by about 25 percent. Certain types of buildings will be more sensitive to climate change than other building types. The aggregated total building energy consumption, including both heating and cooling, will increase only slightly.


  7. Estimating the Economic Impacts of Agricultural Yield-Related Changes for California
    Lead Agency: CEC in collaboration with CAT, CDFA
    Principal Investigator(s): Richard Howitt, Josue Medellin-Azuara, Duncan Macewan Year finished: 2009, Budget: $145,455
    Published/Product: http://energy.ca.gov/publications/displayOneReport.php?pubNum=CEC-500-2009-042-F
    Notes
    This research measured the economic effects of climate-related yield change in California crops. Agricultural yields may be adversely affected by climate warming, resulting in increased production costs per unit.


  8. Estimating the Health Effects of Temperature in California
    Lead Agency: OEHHA in collaboration with CDPH
    Principal Investigator(s): Bart Ostro (OEHHA)
    Year finished: 2009, Budget: $75,000
    Published/Product: in process
    Notes
    This contract will result in analysis of: (1) the effects of temperature on hospitalization, (2) the mitigative impact of air conditioner use, (3) the existence of harvesting in mortality effects (4) temperature effects on premature birth (5) the quantification of future mortality and morbidity impacts of temperature and (6) valuation of mortality impacts from temperature increase


  9. Estimating the Potential Economic Impacts of Climate Change on Southern California Beaches
    Lead Agency: CEC in collaboration with OPC, caltrans, CAT
    Principal Investigator(s): Linwood Pendleton, Philip King, Craig Mohn, D.G. Webster, Ryan K. Vaughn, Peter Adams Year finished: 2009, Budget: $145,455
    Published/Product: http://energy.ca.gov/publications/displayOneReport.php?pubNum=CEC-500-2009-033-F
    Notes
    This study examined the physical and economic effects of permanent beach loss caused by inundation due to sea level rise of one meter and of erosion and accretion caused by a single, extremely stormy year (using a model of beach change based on the wave climate conditions of the El Nino year of 1982/1983.


  10. Evaluation of high altitude hydropower under climate change
    Lead Agency: CEC in collaboration with CAT,CEC
    Principal Investigator(s): Sebastian Vicuna, John Dracup (UC Berkeley)
    Year finished: 2009, Budget: $228,322
    Published/Product: http://energy.ca.gov/publications/displayOneReport.php?pubNum=CEC-500-2009-019-F
    Notes
    Impacts of climate change on high elevation hydropower


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