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Count for all projects in 2012

Impact and Adaptation Studies 160
Regional Climate Analysis and Modeling 88
GHG Emissions Reduction 83
GHG Inventory Methods 61
others 89
481

This site represents only a subset of projects. Please see agency publications for official budget figures.

The State of California has been supporting regional climate change research for more than a decade. These studies have complemented research at the national level and have been designed to inform climate policy deliberations and actions in California. This Research Catalog provides basic information about past and ongoing climate change related studies that state agencies have conducted or commissioned since the early 2000s. The purpose of this catalog is to document California’s research efforts and to facilitate the exchange of information.

To find out more about these projects, please click here to obtain contact information for representatives from different state agencies.

Search results for 2012 Research Projects


  1. Development of A New Methodology to Characterize Truck Body Types Along California Freeways
    Lead Agency: ARB
    Principal Investigator(s): Stephen Richie (UCI)
    Year finished: 2012
    Published/Product: http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/single-project.php?row_id=65098
    Notes
    The main objective of this study is to develop a truck body classification model using inductive loop signature data. The second objective is to deploy a pilot program to collect inductive loop detector signature data at two WIM stations using advanced detector cards. The third objective is to evaluate the performance of the developed model by deploying these advanced detector cards at an additional eight to ten stations.


  2. Effects of Complete Streets on Travel Behavior
    Lead Agency: ARB
    Principal Investigator(s): Yifang Zhu (UCLA)
    Year finished: 2012
    Published/Product: http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/single-project.php?row_id=65095
    Notes
    The objectives of this study are to: (1) understand the impact of complete streets on travel behaviors of local residents; (2) assess how changes in travel behavior will impact subpopulations with different demographic and socio-economic characteristics; (3) illustrate how the impact of complete streets on travel behavior may vary across different typical land-use contexts and road types, and; (4) determine the street users’ exposure to vehicle-related air pollution before and after the complete street conversion. Potential behavioral barriers to the usage of complete streets or behavioral change will also be explored.


  3. EFFECTS OF COMPLETE STREETS ON TRAVEL BEHAVIOR
    Lead Agency: ARB in collaboration with UCLA
    Principal Investigator(s): Yifang Zhu (UCLA)
    Year finished: 2012, Budget: $250,000
    Published/Product: http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/single-project.php?row_id=65095
    Notes
    THE CONTRACTOR WILL DETERMINE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COMPLETE STREETS ON TRAVEL BEHAVIORAL CHANGE AND WILL HELP TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COMPLETE STREETS CONVERSIONS ON THE REDUCTION OF VMT AND STREET USERS’ EXPOSURE TO VEHICULAR EMISSIONS. THIS STUDY IS EXPECTED TO (1) PROVIDE QUANTITATIVE ESTIMATES OF THE EFFECTS OF COMPLETE STREETS ON TRAVEL BEHAVIOR SUCH AS THE CHOICE AND MODE OF COMMUTE AND FREQUENCY OF TRANSIT AND NON-MOTORIZED TRIPS, (2) PROVIDE ESTIMATES OF HOW TRAVEL BEHAVIORAL CHANGES FOLLOWING THE COMPLETE STREET CONVERSION MAY VARY ACROSS POPULATION GROUPS BASED ON DIFFERENT DEMOGRAPHIC AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS; (3) DEMONSTRATE HOW IMPACTS OF COMPETE STREETS MAY VARY ACROSS DIFFERENT LAND USE AND ROAD TYPES; (4) IDENTIFY THE POTENTIAL BARRIERS TO THE USAGE OF COMPLETE STREETS OR BEHAVIORAL CHANGE ; AND (5) SHOW HOW VEHICLE-RELATED AIR POLLUTION EXPOSURES MAY DIFFER AMONG DIFFERENT STREET USERS IN COMPLETE VERSUS INCOMPLETE STREETS. THE CONTRACTOR SHALL PROVIDE VIDEOTAPES OF LICENSE PLATE DATA COLLECTED FOR CARS, TRUCKS, AND MOTORCYCLES TO ARB FOR FURTHER RESEARCH USE. AFTER THE END OF THE STUDY, THE CONTRACTOR WILL SUBMIT A FINAL REPORT, A SEMINAR PRESENTATION TO ARB AND PROVIDE A COPY OF ALL THEIR COLLECTED HOUSEHOLD SURVEY, INTERCEPT SURVEY, AS WELL AS THE TRAFFIC COUNTS AND VIDEOTAPED DATA.


  4. Emissions of Potent Greenhouse Gases from Appliance and Building Waste in Landfills
    Lead Agency: ARB
    Principal Investigator(s): Nazli Yesiller (Cal Poly)
    Year finished: 2012
    Published/Product: http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/single-project.php?row_id=65093
    Notes
    The proposed effort will determine the potent GHG emissions from landfilled insulating foam from recycled appliances and demolished buildings. The major objectives of the project are to: 1) develop a waste flow analysis of each stage of foam waste (from recycling to landfilling); 2) determine GHG emissions from each stage of foam waste prior to landfilling; 3) determine maximum potential GHG emissions from landfilled foam; 4) determine actual emissions of foam GHGs from landfills measuring surface flux emissions, landfill gas collection and combustion system emissions; 5) determine destruction efficiency of foam GHGs captured by landfill gas collection systems; 6) determine reductions of waste foam GHGs within landfill, through biological attenuation or capture/combustion; and 7) scale emissions and reductions results statewide.


  5. Estimation of Methane Emissions from the California Natural Gas System
    Lead Agency: CEC in collaboration with ARB
    Principal Investigator(s): Jeff Kuo (CSU Fullerton)
    Year finished: 2012, Budget: $600,000
    Published/Product: http://energy.ca.gov/publications/displayOneReport.php?pubNum=CEC-500-2014-072
    Notes
    This project produced current, reliable and California‐specific methane fugitive emission factors that could be used to establish a more accurate methane emission inventory for the California natural gas industry. The results from this project could be used to support regulatory programs to achieve effective and efficient methane emission reductions from California’s natural gas system to consequently minimize adverse environmental impacts from these emission sources. The research team surveyed equipment and systems in all five sectors of California natural gas industry: production, processing, storage, transmission and distribution. Equipment and systems surveyed included 172 wellheads, 131 separators, 17 dehydrators, 145 piping segments, 66 compressors (51 reciprocating, nine centrifugal, and six rotary), 374 pneumatic devices, 19 metering and regulating stations, 34 hatches, two pumps and 12 customer meters. Components screened on the equipment consisted of 10,101 flanges, 10,765 manual valves, 384 open‐ended lines, 358 pressure relief valves, 930 regulators, 146 seals, 57,061 threaded connections, 12,274 welded connections and 138 “others.” Three types of component‐level emission factors (average, screening ranges and correlation) were developed using the data generated from field activities during this study. These component‐level emission factors were then used to develop equipment‐level average emission factors when appropriate. 500-09-007


  6. Evaluating Mitigation Options of Nitrous Oxide Emissions in California Cropping Systems
    Lead Agency: ARB
    Principal Investigator(s): Martin Burger (UCD)
    Year finished: 2012, Budget: $400,000
    Published/Product: http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/single-project.php?row_id=65096
    Notes
    The purpose of this project is to identify alternative management practices that can reduce N2O emissions from the following California crops: lettuce, tomatoes, and corn. Specific objectives are to 1) identify experimental sites and establish standard and alternative management practices for the crops; 2) measure N2O fluxes and estimate emission differences between the standard and alternative management practices; 3) characterize key variables controlling N2O emissions; and 4) measure crop yields to evaluate yield-based N2O emission factors and cost-effectiveness.


  7. EVALUATING MITIGATION OPTIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS IN CALIFORNIA CROPPING SYSTEMS
    Lead Agency: ARB in collaboration with UCD
    Principal Investigator(s): Martin Burger (UCD)
    Year finished: 2012, Budget: $400,000
    Published/Product: http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/single-project.php?row_id=65096
    Notes
    The contractor will perform field experiments to monitor N2O fluxes from three of the major California cropping systems: corn, tomatoes, and lettuce, maintained under both conventional and alternative management practices. The proposed alternative management practices will include: use of alternative nitrogen fertilizers, use of nitrification and urease inhibitors, fertigation via subsurface drip irrigation, organic farming, and conservative tillage. The emission data will be collected for two years at a frequency that matches the expected emission fluxes. The measured N2O flux data will be used to calculate annual N2O emissions for each practice. Statistical analysis will be carried out to assess the significance of emission differences between conventional and alternative management practices. In addition, crop yield and total biomass will be measured at harvest to evaluate economics of the management options and calculate nitrogen fertilizer use efficiency. A series of environmental variables, such as soil nitrogen species and content, soil water content, soil organic carbon content, bulk density, and soil and air temperatures, will also be measured concurrently with N2O monitoring and evaluated for their impact on N2O emissions.


  8. Fire and Climate Change in California
    Lead Agency: CEC
    Principal Investigator(s): Krawchuk, M. A., And M. A. Moritz (Simon Fr aser University; University of California, Berkeley)
    Year finished: 2012
    Published/Product: http://energy.ca.gov/publications/displayOneReport.php?pubNum=CEC-500-2012-026
    Notes
    We examine a macro-scaled perspective of fire and climate for California and highlight landscapes where sensitivity and exposure to climate change has the potential to induce alteration of future fire activity. This research presents just one method of proposing a future of fire and includes many caveats and assumptions. Using statistical models, we relate the probability of burning in 1080-m landscapes over a 30-year baseline period of 1971–2000 to climate variables for the same period. These climate variables aim to represent spatial variation in vegetation growth conditions and the seasonal dryness necessary for burning. A metric of distance to human development is used to examine human influence on fire activity via ignition and/or suppression. We quantify how the risk of relatively long-term tendency for burning might change with climate over the next 100 years based on projections from two Global Climate Models and two emissions scenarios. Model outcomes suggest varying degrees of increased future fire activity in more productive regions of California however by 2070–2099, the two GCMs selected for the study disagree in the polarity in response for drier, less productive regions.


  9. Future Climate Scenarios for California: Freezing Isoclines, Novel Climates, and Climatic Resilience of California’s Protected Areas
    Lead Agency: CEC
    Principal Investigator(s): Ackerly, David D. (University of California, Berkeley)
    Year finished: 2012
    Published/Product: http://energy.ca.gov/publications/displayOneReport.php?pubNum=CEC-500-2012-022
    Notes
    Twenty-first century climate change threatens biodiversity, ecosystem services, and human welfare. The diversity of responses and climate sensitivity among species and ecosystems presents a challenge for forecasting, conservation, and resource management. This paper explores several biotically informed analyses of current climates and future climate projections for California, and their implications for biological conservation. 500-09-038


  10. Hotspots of Climate-Driven Increases in Residential Electricity Demand: A Simulation Exercise Based on Household Level Billing Data for California
    Lead Agency: CEC
    Principal Investigator(s): Auffhammer, Maximilian (University of California, Berkeley )
    Year finished: 2012
    Published/Product: http://energy.ca.gov/publications/displayOneReport.php?pubNum=CEC-500-2012-021
    Notes
    One of the obvious modes of adaptation to high er temperatures due to climate change is the increased demand for cooling and decreased de mand for heating in the built environment. California’s residential sector uses relatively little electricity fo r heating, and it is therefore expected that the demand for electricity will increase as households operate existing air conditioners more frequently, and in many regi ons, will install air conditioners where there currently are few. This paper provides reduce d form estimates of changes in electricity consumption due to increased use of installed cooling equipment under a hotter climate. This study adds to the literature by incorporating the change in temperature responsiveness due to likely increases in air conditioner penetration under climate change using a two-stage method. It shows that taking into account these capital investments may lead to higher projections of electricity consumption. These increases in projected electricity consumption were mapped to the ZIP codes in the study data. The paper shows suggestive evidence that more Caucasian and wealthy ZIP codes are projected to experience relatively smaller increases in consumption, while ZIP codes with a higher share of Latino population are projected to experience larger increases in consumption. 500-09-038


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